How to Print Edible Images with Eddie, Edible Image Printer

Creating custom cookies and confections requires a high level of artistic ability and baking skills. Many cooks and bakers bake, frost, and skillfully hand decorates cookies with elaborate detail. With Eddie, the edible image printer, bakers can now easily decorate cookies with photos, logos, and graphics, saving time and adding a level of detail that would not be possible by hand. Bakers can add frosting details on top of the printed cookies for an even higher level of customization. 

In this guide, we’ll go over everything you need to know to become familiar with Eddie, including what Eddie is, how to use Eddie, how Eddie can maximize your profits, and much more.

About Eddie: The Edible Image Printer

Eddie, the edible image printer is unlike other edible image printers on the market. Eddie prints directly onto the food item, whereas some of the other printers on the market print on sugar sheets that need to be applied to the cookie or confection. This adds another expense and time-consuming step to the process of making and decorating cookies. 

In addition to not requiring frosting sheets, Eddie is extremely flexible. Not only can Eddie print on round cookies but also any other shape, including rectangles, hexagons, plaques, or any shape you can make. Some bakers go so far as to create custom 3D printed cookie cutters to fit the shape of a particular graphic or photo. Imagine the shape of a pizza slice made into a cookie and printed like an actual pizza slice! In addition to cookies, Eddie can print on macarons, lollipops, marshmallows, chocolate toppers for cakes, donuts, and much more, making it the most versatile edible image printer on the market today. 

The most important feature that sets Eddie apart from the competition is its food industry certifications. …

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Information Engineering Methodology

Information Engineering Methodology

An information engineering methodology has many advantages. The methodology is based on data modeling and the concept of a data model. The data model defines the Entity types, attributes and relationships between the entities. The Information Engineering Facility is a computer-aided software engineering toolkit developed by Texas Instruments. The software engineering toolset provides one model implementation, consistency checking, management tools for application developers, and a fourth-generation programming language with numeric functions, security within the data model, and inherent database management facilities.

Data model

Data models are representations of data in a given domain. They assume underlying structures and are expressed using a dedicated grammar. A data model represents classes of entities, attributes of information, and relationships between entities. It is a representation of the organization of data and is used in information engineering methodology. There are several different types of data models. In this article, we’ll discuss three of them. Listed below are examples of each.

An ideal basis for a data model is a statement of a business’s management direction for the future. A business plan is a great source of information about what a company needs in the future, and a data model will help visualize these needs. It can be developed from any statement about a company’s policy, objective, or strategy. The goal of the data model is to illustrate changes in the business over time.

Entity types

The first step in implementing an Information Engineering methodology is to identify and categorize entity types. The relationship between the entities in the model is represented by a two-way line with one symbol indicating the other type of entity. The second relationship line has a single symbol for only one entity. The entity names used in the Information Engineering methodology are the same as those used in the BI …

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How to Choose a Consulting Service: The Complete Guide for Businesses

How to Choose a Consulting Service: The Complete Guide for Businesses

The consulting services industry is going to grow by 9% this year, with the industry generating nearly $1 trillion.

Consulting services offer businesses of all types of insights and expertise to help them reach their goals. They give an objective viewpoint and see the things that business owners don’t.

Hiring the right consulting service for your business will make all the difference. Hire the wrong consultant, and you’re just throwing money out the window.

Keep reading to learn how to choose a consulting service that makes a difference in your business.

1. Business Consulting Needs

Consultants can do just about anything. They can help you generate more leads, clarify your marketing strategy, fix your IT problems, improve management skills, and so much more.

If you have a need, there’s a consultant that can address it.

The problem is that most businesses know they need help, they just don’t know what they need help with. That lack of clarity leads to hiring the wrong business consultant.

They have a bad experience and end up wasting money.

You can prevent that scenario from happening by knowing why you’re hiring consulting services. Ask yourself this question: what problem do you want the consultant to solve?

2. Industry Experience

It’s not necessary to hire consulting services that are industry experts. It is very helpful, though.

Industry consultants understand your daily challenges. They also have resources available to help you with those challenges.

For example, dentists have challenges with collections. This resource from 2740Consulting.com offers specific tips for dentists to improve collections.

3. Problem-Solving Skills

You’re hiring consulting services to solve problems within your business. If they don’t have problem-solving or communications skills, they won’t be worth much.

Consultants for businesses have a specific process when they work with clients. Ask them about their methods …

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Information Engineering Vs Computer Science

Information Engineering Vs Computer Science

The debate on the fields of computer science and information engineering is raging on. Which of these fields is right for you? Read on to discover how these disciplines can help you reach your goals. We’ve also examined the salaries, job outlook, and educational requirements of each field. This article will help you determine if information engineering is the right career path for you. Here are some key differences between the two fields. Read on to decide for yourself!

Careers

When choosing between computer science and information engineering careers, consider the following points. For one, both are closely related. Both majors involve working with various types of technologies and analyzing their applications to improve business processes. Computer information systems professionals focus on the development and maintenance of software and hardware systems, while computer scientists analyze and design algorithms to improve business processes. Computer science students focus on the design, programming, and implementation of complex computer systems.

Both fields have similar requirements and pay. For example, a computer engineer with a computer science degree may work with software engineers. Both are necessary, as a computer hardware engineer builds circuit boards, processors, and other hardware. However, computer science tends to focus on the digital world while engineering is more focused on the physical world. If you’re considering both computer science and engineering careers, you need to understand both to decide which program is best for your goals.

Salary

In terms of comparing salaries, there are two basic options: information engineering and computer science. While the two fields have similar job outlooks, the emphasis of each is slightly different. For example, computer scientists usually work in software departments, while computer engineers work in hardware departments. Either way, both degrees can lead to a lucrative career. Base salaries for computer scientists and engineers are …

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Contact Center vs. Call Center: Which Does My Business Need?

When clients want to get in touch with your business or brand, they may do so through your customer support (you can for services from Telnum.net).

In the past, the only way to communicate was through voice calls in call centers. However, clientele can now get in touch with a company through various ways, including emails, website chatbots, social media, and so on, all of which are run by contact centers.

But what is the difference?

Contact Center vs. Call Center: A Closer Approach

A. Call Center

They are places where people work. They deal for both incoming calls and outbound calls (calls originating from a customer service representative, usually sales calls).

These people answer calls from both new and long-term clients.

B. Contact Center

There are various ways people can get in touch with a contact center. These include phone calls, text messages, emails, social accounts, and more!

When people communicate through many different channels, they can move quickly from one to the next. People can also choose how they want to talk.

Now that we have a basic idea of the two, let’s look at their differences:

Omnichannel communication vs. single-channel communication

An average person spends about 7 hours a day on the internet.

Thinking that people are more likely to reach your customer service through digital means makes sense. Millennials are also the majority of people who shop online, and they don’t like to initiate phone calls.

An old-fashioned call center with only one channel (incoming and outgoing calls) is often not enough for this. On the other hand, an omnichannel contact center can meet these demands.

It is easier for your consumers to get in touch with you if you use more than one communication method (email, social media, live chat, etc.) than if you …

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